Courtney Marshall, Amy Pence-Brown, Cat Pausé, and ASDAH Talk Fat Activism

Here is the next installment of  pre-conference interviews from our powerful and inspirational speakers and sponsors, so you can see what an amazing team we’ve got lined up for The Fat Activism Conference to be held September 23-25 on a phone or a computer near you.  Don’t wait to sign up. Hurry to get your spot now!

Speaker Spotlights: We are so excited to highlight three more of the amazing speakers who will be sharing their wisdom with us in September.

Courtney Marshall, Wrong is Not My Name: Black Feminist Fitness

What does Fat Activism mean to you?

Fat activism means, to quote Michelle Cliff, “claiming an identity they taught me to despise.”  I celebrate the beauty and resilience of fat communities while working to dismantle structures that punish fat people for simply existing.  To do this I have to work against other systems like white supremacy, predatory capitalism, and misogyny.  It also means that I make spaces for fat Black female joy and happiness.  It means constantly working for a world that isn’t here yet.

Why do you think Fat Activism is important?

Fat activism teaches me that feelings of unworthiness or disgust were all taught to me.  They have material consequences and incentives, and they can be challenged and unlearned.  I can’t participate in my own destruction, right?  I have to create something new in order for me and other fat people to survive.  This is what the very best activism does.

Can you give us a hint of what we’ll hear from you at the conference?

I’ll talk a bit about my journey out of diet culture into fat activism, my ongoing theorizing of the stereotype of Mammy, my obsession with Fannie Lou Hamer, and my Black feminist fitness program.

Can you provide us with a link where people can learn more about you or connect with you?

Facebook: Black Feminist Fitness

Anything else you (briefly) want folks to know?

Holla at me if you want to talk.  We all we got!

Click here to register for the conference! 

Amy Pence-Brown

What does Fat Activism mean to you?

To me, it means taking up space. Using my voice to add to the conversation. Showing up in my fat body. Being brave and rebellious. Living a happy and fulfilling life out loud. It’s about creating my own media, changing the narrative, and standing for self-love.

Why do you think Fat Activism is important?

I’ve been asked repeatedly about my reclamation of both the terms “fat” and “activist,” since they both have negative connotations in our contemporary culture. People continue to see them both as something untoward and scary, unsavory and daunting. That right there proves to me that our work is not only necessary, but revolutionary.

Can you give us a hint of what we’ll hear from you at the conference?

As a body image activist for the past seven years, I believe in opening my mouth and my heart. From both of these places I tell a powerful story of vulnerability, courage, body positivity and the importance of taking a stand for something you believe in – yourself. You’ll hear more about the making of a fat, forty-year-old feminist mother who recently became famous for stripping down half-nude in a blindfold and a black bikini at a farmers market downtown Boise, Idaho, bravely asking people to draw a heart on my body if they believed that all bodies are valuable and how a video of this radical stand for self-acceptance went viral and has been now seen over 150 million times and covered by media all over the world, including CNN, People, Cosmopolitan, NPR, the Dr. Oz show, Bustle, xoJane, USA Today, Huffington Post, and SHAPE magazine.

Can you provide us with a link where people can learn more about you or connect with you?

Website: www.amypencebrown.com
Facebook: Amy Pence-Brown – Writer, Artist, Body Image Activist
Facebook: Boise Rad Fat Collective
Instagram Idaho_Amy
Twitter @IdahoAmy

Anything else you want folks to know?

I recently gave a TEDx talk titled The Stand for Self-Love that really tells an inspiring story of how I became a fat fierce feminist from Idaho and came to be at peace with my body.

 

Cat Pausé, Friend of Marilyn

What does Fat Activism mean to you?

Fat activism means fat people are the ones who know about their lives. Fat activism means fat people have their voices included in conversations around fatness.

Why do you think Fat Activism is important?

Fat activism is important because fat hate hurts people of all sizes – and while we may not be able to change everyone’s mind about fatness, we can damn sure make it illegal to discriminate against us for our size. And we can strive for a society in which fat people are able to lead their lives the way they want, without apology or shame.

Can you give us a hint of what we’ll hear from you at the conference?

I’m talking about weight discrimination in employment. We explore weight discrimination, and efforts that have been made to make this illegal in pockets across the world. I share my experience of having my employer (a University in New Zealand) add physical size as a protected category in policy documents.

Can you provide us with a link where people can learn more about you or connect with you?

iTunes: Friend of Marilyn
Facebook: Friend of Marilyn; Cat’s personal page
Twitter: @FOMNZ
Tumblr: FriendofMarilyn
Blog: Friend of Marilyn
YouTube: Friend of Marilyn
Google Citations: Cat Pausé
Academia.Edu: Cat Pausé
Research Gate: Cat Pausé

Anything else you want folks to know?

I hosted Fat Studies: Identity, Agency, Embodiment in New Zealand in June. All of the speakers were video recorded using Mediasite, and people can still register for the online option to get access for up to a year (Tinyurl.com/fsnz16); it’s the only Fat Studies conference in the world, so I’d recommend checking it out if you are interested in fat scholarship. The price has dropped to 25NZD/18USD, but you only have until 30 Sept to register!

 

Click here to register for the conference! 

Sponsor Spotlight

ASDAH

What does Fat Activism mean to you? 

Fat Activism means taking action and speaking out against weight stigma, bias, and discrimination so that we can begin to dismantle the ways oppression operates systemically in our lives and ensure that all bodies are welcome. Fat Activism does not exist in a vacuum. People experience inequalities differently, so fat activism also means recognizing the ways that fat stigma intersects with other identities.

Why do you think Fat Activism is important?

Fat Activism is important because it brings vital attention to the essential humanity of individuals with larger bodies. Unfortunately, bias, stigma and discrimination won’t just work their way out of our cultures without effort, and Fat Activism is important because it sits at the forefront of that effort, demanding respect for all people and all bodies, regardless of their size, weight, health status or ability.

Can you provide us with a link where people can learn more about you or connect with you?

Website: www.sizediversityandhealth.org

Anything else you  want folks to know?

ASDAH recognizes and is grateful for the many Fat Activists who have come before us and paved the way.

We hope that many of you will join ASDAH and work with us to push forward the intersection of the work that the Fat Activism and Health At Every Size® communities are doing.

Click here to register for the conference! 

Thanks to our amazing sponsors!

Platinum Sponsor

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Gold Sponsors

ASDAH Banner 2

Friend of Marilyn Banner

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Silver Sponsors

The Body Postive Banner

Melissa Fabello Banner

Community Partner

More of Me to Love

Click here to register for the conference! 

About danceswithfat

Hi, I’m Ragen Chastain. Speaker, Writer, Dancer, Choreographer, Marathoner, Soon to be IRONMAN, Activist, Fat Person.
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